Tag Archives: walking trail
January 22, 2014

Woza eNanda Walking Trail – update 3

After the Festive Season break, the planning meetings for the Woza eNanda Walking Trail resumed on 20/1/14 at the INK ABM Offices in KwaMashu.

Gary Cullen from Durban Green Corridor welcomed everyone and briefly summarized the purpose of the initiate and the status quo of the planning.  While the walking trail directly links with the Woza eNanda Heritage Route, the key idea is to provide more options for visitors to interact with the community and the latter to benefit economically from such visits. Mostly the walking trail is meant to attract tourists, local visitors, and especially young people, who are not in a group or with a tour operator, but who would like to have a township experience, participate in social events (e.g. involving music, soccer, taverns) or simply walk ‘off the beaten track’.

The main focus of this meeting was the clean-up operations and addressing environmental problems. Mostly this refers to litter removal and alien invasive clearing, but also includes attending to water leakages, sewage and effluence problems and rehabilitation. It was agreed that these issues should be tackled on a ward basis, notably wards 54, 55 and 57. The respective ward councillors will be informed and a presentation will be arranged at the INK Councillors Forum.  Lindelani Zuke, who is the newly appointed horticulturalist at Durban Green Corridor, will be the coordinator for the environmental team. The first priority is to take GPS readings and map problem areas more precisely.

The management of the waste collection skips will be taken up with DSW, but it is also important to engage with the local co-ops in the area to ensure that residents are indeed placing their rubbish into the skips, rather than piling it up around it. The community must play a key role in deciding how to take the clean-up forward. The ward councillors might call a community meeting to this effect. DSW can supply bags, gloves, a few tools and will arrange a date of collection.  These efforts can extend or link in with existing programmes such as ‘Adopt a Spot’, etc.

Sihlanzimvelo is currently involved in litter removal, alien clearing and rehabilitation along the streams, but only for 3 metres on each side. Areas where infestation extends much further must be identified and attended to independently.  Experience shows that once an area has been cleared, people immediately start planting vegetables there. Consultation with the community must occur; while the project can facilitate community gardening, this must occur in a planned and organized manner.

The area around the sports field (ward 55 only) was selected as a key focal point of intervention, from where the cleaning effort will radiate out. This area has a lot of potential, as it engages many residents through play and sports facilities; the pond can be turned into an attractive wetland and recreational resource. This cleaned up area can be a showcase for the entire project and an information board could be set up there.

Angela Baker (not present at this meeting) is working on a project with City Architects in preparation for the international Architecture conference in August. It is called ‘Pocket parks’ and involves art installations and other interventions in selected areas. One of these areas is near the Gandhi Settlement and this initiative, while proceeding independently, should be coordinated with the walking trail project, especially the development of a shorter loop trail around the Gandhi Settlement.

While  Lindelani’s team focuses on the clean-up, the second team, coordinated by Sabine, carries on with content development. Both work-streams must link with the schools and engage with teachers to involve them in the clean-up and help design the trail to suit their educational needs.

The following persons were present at the meeting: Gary Cullen – DGC, Alina Fleczok-DGC, Mandla Nxumalo-DurbanTourism, Sanele Mvuyane-DGC, Sandile Maphumulo-INK-ABM, Loyiso Ntsalaze –DGC, Sabine Marschall-UKZN, Bart Fokkens-DGC, Wiseman Mhlongo –DGC, Lindelani Zuke –DGC, Nolwandle Zulu –DSW, Siphiwe Cele –INK-ABM, Thuyi Dludla –DSW, Zandile Ngcobo-DGC, Mpume Gumede-CSCM, Christi Cupido –BMK Consultants, Snqobile Nkabinde –BMK Consultants

Compiled by Sabine Marschall 21/1/14

January 17, 2014

Woza eNanda Walking Trail – cultural & social points of interest

IMG_8123

Loyiso, Sanele & Mlu

What can one see and experience along the eNanda Walking Trail?

Below are some explanations and opinions provided by Mlu Mthembu, Loyiso Ntsalaze and Sanele Mvuyane from Inanda, but please contribute your own knowledge by leaving a comment or e-mailing us at enandaonline@gmail.com.

Follow these links for more information about plants along the trail or small shops and informal businesses.  For more information about the Woza eNanda Walking Trail trail initiative, check out our regular updates.

 

Dube family home

Dube family home

Dube family home

John Dube built this home, near the Ohlange Institute, in 1921. It is still occupied today by his only surviving daughter, Lulu Dube.

Follow this link for an interview with Lulu Dube.

 

 

 

 

Homes

Township homes may all look much alike at first sight, but are in fact displaying a great variety of building styles, shapes and materials. They reflect the aspirations and prosperity of the homeowners, but also cultural beliefs. For instance, a round hut on the premises indicates that a traditionalist (non-Christian) lives here; white border stones are used by Shembe believers. Tires on roof tops are believed to protect the home from lightning strikes and people sometimes store other items of top of the roof for protection from thieves. Even the most modest shack may be equipped with a satellite dish.

Listen here for more:

Stones and tires on the roof

Satellite dishes

Round huts

RDP houses

Horns on the wall

Upgrading a home

Fruit and vegetables

People in eNanda grow vegetable in every available spot of land around their home. Most common crops are meali (corn), pumpkin, beans, sweet potato, madumbi, etc. Mealis are especially important as a staple diet. Fruit trees – mango, avocado, bananas, pawpaw, and grapefruit are especially common in the vicinity of the Shembe settlement.

About mealies 

Goats and chicken

Goats and chicken are roaming around everywhere, because they are not only a source of meat, but important for ritual purposes. Goats represent the link with the ancestors and are slaughtered when ceremonies are performed. Among the chicken, only the black and white chicken are sacrificial animals, each for a different purpose. The goat’s horns are displayed above the door or on a pole around the homestead after the ceremony and pieces of skin are worn on people’s wrist.

Chickens

Black and white chickens

 

Children’s games

Children in eNanda have few toys, but they can be seen having fun with their own kind of games. Amagenda is a game played with small stones; udonkey is played with tennis balls. Then there is street soccer with very small goals and special rules;  uqithi involves climbing up into a tree and vumvum is a toy made out of string and a pierced flattened bottle-top.

Children’s games

Street soccer

 

Street names and house numbers

Street names may be taken for granted in the city, but were only introduced in some parts along the trail as late as last year. Previously, homes were simply numbered and now, the old and the new numbering system coexist. Some people proudly decorate the new street number on the wall of their home.

 

Some interesting snippets

IMG_8151Imbizweni – place of judgement: This old fig tree at the Gandhi Settlement was used as a meeting place for community elders to consult and pass judgement.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8006 Shoes hanging from the overhead lines once referred to drugs being sold around here, remember Loyiso, Mlu and  Sanele, but this meaning has changed today …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8077Piles of wood stored next to a house indicate that the family is preparing for a ritual.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8052 Wrecks or old cars are found at various homesteads.  They might be keepsakes in memory of their owner …

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8119 Preparing skins for clothing and ritual purposes is a highly developed skill…

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_8175 At this inconspicuous homestead, not far from the Gandhi Settlement, traditional Infene dance performances take place at the weekend at the end of each month.

 

 

 

 

 

Dead trees could be an indication of witchcraft, as a neighbour may have sent lighting.

House music is very popular and may be heard coming out of various homes.

 

 

There are many NGOs in the area and some of them could be potentially be visited with prior arrangements. More information about them will follow shortly.

 

 

 

This is a GPS capture of the routes we took from Ohlange to Phoenix and back, mapped onto Google Earth.

track 1

 

 

 

 

Compiled by Sabine Marschall 17/1/14

November 26, 2013

Woza eNanda Walking Trail – update (2)

On 22 November, the task team for the development of the Woza eNanda Walking Trail met at Phoenix Settlement to evaluate the experience of the exploratory walk between Ohlange and Phoenix the previous week.  Participants shared their positive impressions, but also highlighted some challenges, notably sewerage, litter, and alien invasion. During the course of the week, a team from BMK Engineering has been involved in alien vegetation clearing; this currently covers only a 3 metre strip from the edge of the stream, but must be extended. Litter and raw sewerage are major problems; service infrastructure must be improved and community education intensified.  A preliminary map has been produced in which problem areas of attention are marked (to view the map, click here: 20130912_woza eNanda Trail 1-7500).
On Monday, a team from Durban Green Corridor had conducted more detailed explorations around Ohlange. Various specific problems were noted and points of interest identified. These include a braai area, tuck shops, and an NGO specializing in feeding children (Rise and Shine), whose founder is also a traditional healer. A similar detailed exploration must now take place around Phoenix. Two loop walks around these core heritage site anchors are then to be linked by a circular route to create a varied network of trails. An audit of attraction points, shops and potential service providers will be conducted.
Durban Solid Waste is very positive about this project; they are aware of current problems and committed to assist with the clean-up operation, but various other municipal departments must also be engaged: Parks; Roads & Stormwater; Safer Cities; Business Support; Electricity; the local ward councillor; as well as SAPS. Once a route has been finalized, a team of representatives from these departments should walk the trail and take note of their respective areas of responsibility. Durban Tourism must be specifically engaged to establish lines of responsibility with respect to the development and marketing of the trail for tourists. In terms of community awareness, Inanda FM will be asked to feature the trail project. Through learners at schools, a snowball system of communication with the wider community will be set in motion and learners must play a role in setting an example and inspiring others to keep the trail clean and safe. In terms of attractions, some specific suggestions included getting a Rastafarian band to perform on a regular basis at S’bu’s tavern to create a local entertainment resource that will over time also attract visitors from the outside.  Everyone agreed once again on the importance of community participation, creating a sense of ownership and developing the trail as a valuable resource for the community itself.
In the next two weeks, the chair will facilitate interdepartmental engagement; exploration around Phoenix will take place and selected clean-up efforts will get underway.
The next meeting will be on Wednesday 4 December at Phoenix Settlement: 10am. NB: This meeting has been postponed to 20 January 2014.

Present at the meeting: From Durban Green Corridor (DGC): Gary Cullen (chair), Mathabo; Alina; from BMK Engineering Consultants: Christy Cupido ; Sinqobile Nkabinde, Thokoza Mthembu; Durban Solid Waste: Sandile Myende; City Architects: Angela Baker; Inanda Seminary: Scott Couper; Inanda Community Tourism Board: Baphulile Bhengu; Member of community: Sanele Mvuyane; Mandla Kayise Primary School:  Fikile Zondi; Inanda Comprehensive School: Lungile Ntuli; INK Tourism: Zwakele Khumalo; Durban Tourism: Brenda Phakathi;  Ohlange Heritage site: Mandla Nxumalo; Phoenix Settlement: Bongani Mthembu; University of KwaZulu-Natal & eNanda Online: Sabine Marschall

Sabine Marschall 26/11/13

20130912_woza eNanda Trail 1-7500

 

 

November 16, 2013

Woza eNanda Walking Trail – update (1)

Woza eNanda Walking Trail Development Team

Despite the rainy weather, a dedicated task team set out on an exploratory walk from Phoenix Settlement to Ohlange on Friday 15 November. This followed the inaugural planning meeting held the previous week. The team found that the trail has great appeal and could become both a unique resource for the local community and a big tourist attraction, with many opportunities for local people to benefit. However, there are also problem areas that need to be addressed, including litter, alien invasion, slippery mud paths, and difficult water crossings.

The next meeting will be held on Friday 22 November at Phoenix Settlement 10am to discuss the experience and the way forward. Please leave your comments and suggestions below!

 

These pictures were taken along the exploratory walk:

eNanda2

GPS based route mapping

 

Sabine Marschall 16/11/13

 

 

November 9, 2013

Woza eNanda Walking Trail – Inaugural meeting

The municipality, under the leadership of Durban Green Corridor, is planning to develop a walking trail through Inanda, ultimately leading all the way from Bridge City to the Inanda Dam area. This is meant to turn existing green spaces in Inanda into useful recreational resources for the community and attract hikers and tourists to provide a unique local experience and create economic benefits for the community.

An initial planning meeting was held at Phoenix Settlement on 8 November 2013 and this report sums up what was discussed. Watch this space for regular updates and leave your comments and suggestions below!

Attendance

A variety of stakeholder were invited and the following persons attended: Gary Cullen (Durban Green Corridor (DGC) – chair of meeting); Angela Baker (City Architects); Bongani Mthembu (Phoenix Settlement); Mandla Nxumalo (Ohlange); Siyabonga Luthuli (Business Support Unit); Desan Gounden (Parks Department); Sabine Marschall (UKZN and eNanda Online); Zandile Ngcobo (DGC); Lungile Ntuli (Inanda Comprehensive High School); Patrick Masinga (Durban Tourism); Siphiwe Cele ( INK – ABM); Rev Scott Couper (Inanda Seminary); Wiseman Mhlongo  (DGC);  Brenda Phathaki (Durban Tourism); Alina Fleczok (intern with DGC); Mareike Behnke (intern with DGC); Loyiso Ntslaze (intern with DGC).

Discussion

– the trail will complement the city’s Woza eNanda driving route, but provide a uniquely different experience with emphasis on human encounters and community interaction and spending opportunities for tourists;

– development in sections, starting with the section from Phoenix Settlement via Ekuphakameni to Ohlange Institute, and extension over time.

– different coloured signs and interpretation boards can be put up along the trail to map out routes with different thematic emphasis: e.g. cultural/historical, nature-based, fun/entertainment;  sport eg hiking, running and mountain biking.

– a very preliminary route has been mapped out (see picture), but the details are to be determined;

– community participation and ownership are very important from the planning phase to implementation and management to bring forward the many possible attractions, to ensure sustainability and for safety for walkers;

– strong emphasis on school participation; competitions can be held among the schools; learners can be involved in clean-up campaigns and in designing the details of the trails; through learners, awareness is created among parents and the wider community;

– the trail can become an important educational resource for school learners;

– clean-up and visual improvement is needed (e.g. signage, paving, landscaping)

– various members of the community can get involved and potentially benefit by providing services or ‘attractions’ along the path; e.g. providing opportunities for tasting home-cooked food, etc.

– awareness must be created among various potential users of the trail, including Amblers, Ramblers and other hiking clubs; MTB community, etc.

– sponsored annual events could be held that draw in schools from other parts of eThekwini to participate alongside local schools and community members

– tourism sector must be made aware to develop products and services along the route;

 

Immediate action

–  on Tuesday 12 November a small alien clearing team will check the proposed route and open up where necessary;

–  on Friday 15 November at 8am, a task team will walk a small section of the proposed trail, starting from Phoenix Settlement to Ohlange to get a hands-on experience of the opportunities and challenges. Anyone is invited to join!

–   The following schools – Shembe Primary; Kasturba Gandhi Primary; Inanda Comprehensive High School; Ohlange High School; Mandla Kayisa Lower Primary and Langalibalele Higher Primary School, which are situated along the first section of the trail, will be encouraged to participate and they will be approached to send a management representative on the walk on Friday 15 November.

 

Next meeting

Friday 22 November 10am at Phoenix Settlement.

The agenda will be …

–  to discuss the findings from the 15 November walk

– to consider a draft project concept plan

– to consider if any possible start up activities during December

 

Sabine Marschall 8/11/13

Woza eNanda Walking Trail, approximate preliminary route proposal

Woza eNanda Walking Trail, approximate preliminary route proposal

Detail: Phoenix to Ohlange