Tag Archives: Tea Estate
July 11, 2013

G.K.Moodley – Inanda Tea Estate

Arisha Govender

Arisha Govender

Mr G.K. Moodley

G.K.Moodley

An interview with Mr G.K. Moodley at V.K. Govender’s farm in Inanda Tea Estate.

Mr Moodley talks about his Primary education at Moonsamy’s School in Tea Estate, Inanda. He proceeded to Tongaat to continue his Secondary Education as there were no further schooling established in the area. The main mode of transport for the people were trains. He counted himself lucky as one of the teachers at the school should transport him to Tongaat. He then proceeded to teacher training at Springfield Park in Durban. He had to travel using the train as well as walking 2km per one way trip. His successful career in Education  took him to vast amounts of schools. Distinct thoughts were brought back while sharing his memories. He recalls meeting a teacher who had previously taught him as well as a petrol shortage. Mr Moodleys’ family owned and still owns two plots of land at Inanda for over 50 years. They farm vegetables, sugar cane and bananas. He has 10 brothers and 3 sisters which he shares a close relationship with. On rainy days all the children got involved in the farm and had to do planting. In the area all people where treated like family even if they were not related. He ends his interview acknowledging the parents who contributed to building their schools, as well as the other stakeholders who he believed had made them be who and were they are today.

Interviewer: Arisha Govender, 13 June 2013

 

 

July 11, 2013

John Pungan – Inanda Tea Estate

John Pungan

John Pungan

An interview with Mr John Pungan on V.K. Govender’s farm, Inanda Tea Estate.

John is a direct descendant of the immigrants that came India. On the 19th February 1907, a ship called Umhloti 1had arrived from India to the shores of Durban in which his parents arrived. The old Point area (now known as Addington) is were the  ship had docked its anchor. His parents were sent to Inanda for work. In 1913 a strike had broke out due to the ill-treatment and others issues including the necessity of permits to be on them at all times when they travelled anywhere. His father was arrested during the protest on suspicion of inciting the other employees and was transferred to Pietermaritzberg. Days went by and eventually his father returned to “upper Inanda” where they were allowed to buy leased land. They had used the land to grow crops. The boys duty was to work in the farm and the girls were in the kitchen. Girls had to do all the cooking and cleaning although there was no taps with a constant supply of water or electricity to cook (they used firewood).

In 1950, John had completed his secondary schooling and continued to become an educator. He then became the first teacher in his family. Girls could not attend Secondary or Tertiary schooling although they had the intellect as schools were a distance away and parents felt that it was unsafe for them to attend.

John, had contributed to the Moonsamys School with numerous other people who aided in levelling the grounds in which the school was built by farmers in the area, raising funds for building a tennis court as pupils were already actively involved with other sport such as soccer and cricket. The state had contributed 50% toward the school as well as the local farmers who willingly aided financially and physically at any given time.

After retirement, he got involved with community work and formed a Retired Teachers Society (involve socially), assisted in the Child and Family Welfare Society, Day and Frail care centre (spent 6 years as a Chairperson), established a sports society and bowls club (held the chairperson position for 11 years – teachers & non teachers of all races participate in bowls which had previously been a white-only sport)  and the Historical Society which in turn formed and contributed greatly to the Documentation Centre at the Verulam municipal library.

Interviewed by Arisha Govender 13 June 2013

Arisha Govender

Arisha Govender

July 11, 2013

S.’Bobby’ Kisten – Inanda Tea Estate

Bobby Kisten

Bobby Kisten

An interview with Mr S. ‘Bobby’ Kisten on V.K. Govender’s farm, Inanda Tea Estate.

Mr Kisten revisits his past memories from when he was given the name “Bobby”. This was given to him by Olive Warner who was a London missionary who had established a school in Tea Estate Inanda. In 1940 Moonsamys’ Government aided school was built in Tea Estate by the Indians of the area. Bobby was one of the first pupils to attend the school. He furthered his education to become a teacher and thereafter a principle. Being very athletic, he became part of the sports council of the school. People were forthcoming and contributed to the erection and development of Moonsamys’ School. It was the first school to encourage concerts were pupils performed traditional songs and dances. They had a Tamil school which held religious functions whereby all partake and travel throughout Inanda. His family owned a farm in Inanda and he had to take care of the animals (cows, mules, donkeys etc). He feels that Tea Estate was the most beautiful area with simple, humble and very accommodating people.

Interviewed by Arisha Govender 13 June 2013.

Arisha Govender

Arisha Govender

 

July 11, 2013

V.K. Govender – Inanda Tea Estate

V.K.Govender

V.K.Govender

An interview with Mr V.K. Govender on his former farm in Inanda Tea Estate. Interviewed by Arisha Govender 13 June 2013.

Mr VK Govender was born in 1932 at Tea Estate Inanda. He thinks back and shares his memories of what Inanda used to be, while sitting on his family farm which he still owns today. This farm has been in his family for over 100 years. Moonsamy’s School (attended by him – Primary Schooling) which he calls the “Finest Country School” had bred excellently trained teachers with the capabilities to an entire school.  This is the career which he had pursued until 1992. In that year he had retired and wanted to returned to his family farm in Tea Estate Inanda. By then his farm had been taken over by squatters. A struggle which lasted about 10 years for him to successfully reclaim his family farm. He recalls his brothers managing and supervising the farm. All amenities were 8km away in Verulam. His farm was not directly affected by the Riots.  However people heard about what had happened in “Lower Inanda” which was 10-12km away and rumours of another riots instilled fear in the people of Tea Estate. They became so afraid that they moved away and the area soon became a ghost area. Mr VK Govender has spent his entire retirement at the farm and is trying to build what once was. He treasures the memories and stated that there was a “Good life in Inanda with good people”.

Arisha Govender

Arisha Govender

Interviewed by Arisha Govender 17 May 2013.